Purchase auto insurance online

Purchase auto insurance online with absolute the best prices. Auto insurance quotes

Advantages and Disadvantages on Group Health Insurance VS Individual Health Insurance

/
/
/
12 Views

In this article we'll explore the reasons that motivate employers to get group health Insurance for employees and we'll look at the advantages and disadvantages from both points of view.

Group Health Insurance VS Individual Private Health Insurance

Probably the most significant distinguishing characteristic of group insurance is the substitution of group underwriting for individual underwriting. In group cases, no individual evidence of insurability is usually required. Benefit levels can be substantial, with few, if any, important limitations.

Groupwriting usually isn't concerned with the health or other insurability aspects of any particular individual. Rather, it aims to obtain a group of individual lives or, what's even more important, an aggregation of such groups of lives that'll yield a predictable rate of mortality or morbidity. If a sufficient number of groups of lives is obtained. If these groups are reasonably homogeneous in nature, then the mortality or morbidity rate will be predictable. The point is that the group becomes the unit ofwriting. Insurance principles may be applied to it just as in the case of the individual. To insure that the groups obtained will be reasonably homogeneous, the underwriting process in group insurance aims to control adverse selection by individuals within a group.

Inwriting group insurance, then, certain important features should be present that either are inherent in the nature of the group itself or may be applied in a positive way to avoid serious adverse selection such as:

Insurance Incidental to the Group: The insurance should be incidental to the group. that's, the members of the group should've come together for some purpose other than to obtain insurance. For example, the group insurance furnished to the employees of a given employer mustn't be the feature that motivates the formation and existence of the group.

Flow of Persons through the Group: There should be a steady flow of persons through the group. that's, there must be an influx of new young lives into the group and an out flow from the group of the older and impaired lives. With groups of actively working employees, it may be assumed that they're in average health.

Automatic Determination of Benefits: Group insurance underwriting commonly requires an automatic basis for determining the amount of benefits on individual lives, which is beyond the control of the employer or employees. If the amount of benefits taken were completely optional, it'd be possible to select against the insurer because those in poor health would tend to insure heavily and the healthy ones might tend to elect minimum coverage.

As the group mechanism has evolved, however, insurers have responded to demands from the marketplace, particularly large employers. More flexibility in the selection of benefits. This flexibility typically is expressed in optional amounts of life and health insurance in excess of basic coverage provided by the employer and in more health care financing choices. Also, increasingly popular cafeteria plans allow participating employees to select among an array of benefits using a predetermined allowance of employer funds. Individuals select, subject to certain basic coverage's being required, a combination of benefits that best meet his or her individual needs.

Minimum Participation by the Group: Another underwriting control is the requirement that substantially all eligible persons in a given group be covered by insurance. In plans in which the employee pays a portion of the premium (contributory), generally at least 75 percent of the eligible employees must join the plan if coverage is to be effective. In the case of noncontributory plans, 100 percent participation is required. By covering a large proportion of a given group, the insurance company gains a safeguard against an undue proportion of substandard lives. In cases in which employees refuse the insurance for religious or other reasons that don't involve any elements of selection, this rule is relaxed.

Third Party Sharing of Cost: A portion of the cost of a group plan ideally should be borne by the employer or some third party, such as a labour union or trade association. The noncontributory employer-pay-all plan is simple. It gives the employee full control over the plan. It provides for insurance of all eligible employees and thus, eliminates any difficulties involved in connection with obtaining the consent of a sufficient number of employees to meet participation requirements. Also, there is no problem of distributing the cost among various employees, as in the contributory plan.

Contributory plans are usually less cost to the employer. Here, with employee contributions, the employer is likely to arrange for more adequate protection for the employees. It can also be argued that, if the employee contributions towards his or her insurance, he or she'll be more impressed with its value and will appreciate it more. On the other hand, the contributory plan has a number of disadvantages. Its operation is more complicated. This at times, increases administrative cost considerably.

Each employee must consented to contribute towards his or her insurance. As stated before, a minimum percentage of the eligible group must consent to enter the arrangement. New employees entering the business must be informed of their insurance privilege. If the plan is contributory, employees may not be entitled to the insurance until they've been with the company for a period of time. If they don't agree to be covered by the plan within a period of 31 days, they may be required to provide satisfactory evidence of insurability to become eligible. Some noncontributory plans also have these probationary periods.

Efficient Administrative Organisation: A single administrative organisation should be able and willing to act on behalf of the insured group. In the usual case, this is the employer. In the case of a contributory plan, there must be a reasonably simple method, such as payroll deduction, by which the master policy owner can collect premiums. An automatic method is desirable for both an administrative and underwriting perspective. A number of miscellaneous controls of underwriting significance are typically used in group insurance plans. The precedent discussion permits an appreciation of the group underwriting theory. The discussion applies to groups with a large number of employees.

A majority of the groups, however, aren't large. The group size is a significant factor in the underwriting process. In smaller plans, more restrictive auditing practices relating to adverse section are used. These may include less liberal contract provisions, simple health status questions. In some cases, detailed individual underwriting of group members.

Group Policy: A second characteristic of group insurance is the use of a group policy (contract) held by the owner as group policyholder and booklet-certificates or other summary evidence of insurance held by plan participants. Certificates provide information on the plan provisions and the steps required to file claims. The use of certificates and a master contract constituents one of the sources of economy under the group approach. The master contract is a detailed document setting forth the contractual relationship between the group contract owner and the insurance company. The insured persons under the contract, usually employees and their beneficiaries, aren't actually parties to the contract, although they may enforce their rights as third party beneficiaries. The four party relationship between the employer, insurer, employee. Dependents in a group insurance plan can create a number of interesting and unusual problems that are common only to group insurance.

Lower Cost: A third feature of group insurance is that it's usually lower-cost protection than that which is available in individual insurance. The nature of the group approach permits the use of mass distribution and mass administration methods that afford economics of operation not available in individual insurance. Also, because group insurance isn't usually written on an individual basis, the premiums are based upon an actuarial assessment of the group as a whole. A given healthy individual can sometimes buy insurance at a lower cost. Employer subsidisation of the cost is a critical factor in group insurance plan design. Probably the most significant savings in the cost of marketing group insurance lies in the fact that group responsibilities absorb a much smaller proportion of total premiums than commision for individual contracts.

The marketing system relieves the agent or broker of many duties, responsibilities. Expenses normally associated with selling or servicing of individual insurance. Because of the large premiums involved in many group insurance cases, the commision rates are significantly lower than for individual contracts and are usually graduated downward as the premium increases. Some large group insurance buyer's deal directly with insurance companies and contracts are eliminated. In these cases, however, fees are frequently paid to the consultants involved. The nature of the administrative procedures permits simplified accounting techniques. The mechanisms of premium collection are less involved. Experience refund procedures much simplified because there is only one party with which to deal with such as the group policy owner.

Of course, the issue of a large number of individual contracts is avoided and, because of the nature of group selection, the cost of medical examinations and inspection reports is minimized. Also, regulatory filings and other requirements are minimized. In the early days of group insurance, administration was simple. that's no longer true. Even with group term . Which there is no cash value, the push for accelerated death benefits, assignment to vatical companies. Estate or business planning record keeping means that the administration of coverage may be as complex as with an individual policy.

Flexibility: in contrast to individual contracts that must be taken as written, the larger employer typically has options in the design and preparation of the group insurance contract. Although the contracts follow a pattern and include certain standard provisions, there is significantly more flexibility here than in the case of individual contracts. The degree of flexibility allowed is, of course, a function of the size of the group involved. The group insurance program usually is an integral part of an employee benefit program and, in most cases, the contract can be moulded to meet the objectives of the contract owner, as long as the request don't entitle complicated administrative procedures, open the way to possibly serious adverse selection. Violate legal requirements.

Experience Rating: Another special feature of group insurance is that premiums often are subject to experience rating. The experience of the individual group may have an important bearing on dividends or premium-rate adjustments. The larger and, hence, the more reliable the experience of the particular group, the greater is the weight attached to its own experience in any single year. The knowledge that promotions net of dividends or premium rate adjustments will be based on the employers own experience gives the employer a vested interest in maintaining a favourable loss and expense record. For the largest employers, insurers may agree to complicated procedures to satisfify the employer's objectives because most cases are experience measured and reflect the increased cost.

Some insurers experience rate based on the class or type of industry. Even based on the type of contract. For small groups, most insurance companies'. Use pooled rates under which a uniform rate is applied to all such groups, although it's becoming more common to apply separate pooled rates for groups with significantly better or worse experience than that of the total class. The point at which a group is large enough to be eligible for experience rating varies from company to company, based on that insurer's book of business and experience. The size and frequency of medical claims vary widely across countries and among geographical regions within a country and must be considered in determining a group insurance rate. The composition (age, sex. Income level) of a group will also affect the experience of the group and, similarly, will be an important underwriting consideration.
Advantages and Limitations of the Group Mechanism.

Advantages: The group insurance mechanism has proved to be a remarkably effective solution to the need for employee benefits for a number of reasons. The utilisation of mass-distribution techniques has extended protection to large numbers of person s with little or no life or health insurance. The increasing complexity of industrial service economies has brought large numbers of persons together. The group mechanism has enabled insurance companies to reach vast numbers of individuals within a relatively short period and at low cost. Group insurance also has extended protection to a large number of uninsurable persons. Equally important has been the fact that the employee usually pays a large share of the cost. Moreover, in most countries, including the United States, the deductibility of employer contributions and the favourable tax treatment of the benefits to employees make it a tax effective vehicle with which to provide benefits.

Another significant factor. One of the more cogent motivations for the rapid development of group insurance, has been the continuing governmental role in the security benefits area. Within the United States, Old-Age. Survivors, Disability. Health Insurance programs have expanded rapidly. Many observers believe that, hadn't group insurance provided substantive sums of , health insurance. Retirement protection, social insurance would've developed even more quickly. As economies worldwide continue to reduce the size and scope of social insurance programs, we can expect the demand for group based security to grow even more.

Disadvantages: From the perspective of the employee, group insurance has one great limitation- the temporary nature of the coverage. Unless an employee converts his or her coverage to an individual policy which is usually ore expensive and provides less liberal coverage, the employee loses his or her insurance protection if the group plan is terminated and often also at retirement because employment is terminated. Group life and health protection is continued after retirement in a significant proportion of cases today in the United States. Often at reduced levels. Recently, with the introduction of a new US accounting standard (FAS 106) requiring that the cost of such benefits be accrued and reflected in financial statements, an increasing number of employers have discontinued post retirement life and health benefits absolutely. When such continued protection isn't available, the temporary nature of the coverage is a serious limitation.

Retiree group health insurance often is provided as a supplement to Medicare. Another problem of potential significance involves individuals who may be hauled into complacency by having large amounts of group insurance during their working years. Many of these persons fail to recognise the need for. Are unwilling to face the cost of, individual insurance. Sometimes of even greater significance is the fact that the flexibility of the group approach is limited to the design of the master policy and doesn't extend to the individual covered employees. Furthermore, group plans typically fail to provide the mechanism for any analysis of the financial needs of the individual which is a service that's typically furnished by the agent or other advisor. Many agents, however, discuss group insurance coverage with individuals as a foundation for discussing the need for additional amounts of individual life and health insurance.



by

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
adimage
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

It is main inner container footer text